Am I Ready to Write?

National Novel Writing Month

This morning I went to a National Novel Writing Month Kick-off.  Lori Robinett, the Municipal Liason for Fulton, explained the whole concept to the newbies and helped them get signed up on nanowrimo.org.  She had workbooks, stickers, and Black Warrior pencils for each of us.  I sat there munching on a doughnut, sipping my coffee, enjoying every moment until she pointed out the countdown clock on the nano website. Two days?  It starts in two days?

I’m not ready. Will not be ready in two days. No way.  It’s not like this is my first nanowrimo rodeo, this will be my 7th year, so I don’t have the excuse that I’ve never done it before and don’t know HOW to get ready. I know. I just haven’t done it. Here are the essential steps:

  1. Tell your family and your friends all about National Novel Writing Month. Explain how important writing  is to your sense of personal happiness. Ask them to please do all they can to help you have free time to write during November. You must do this every year. Trust me, they will not remember what you said last year.
  2. Get your living space as clean and well organized as you possibly can. Get all caught up on the laundry. Put everybody’s socks and underwear away where they can be found without assistance from you. (This won’t last all month, but it gives you a few days to get started.)
  3. Stock up on groceries. Even if you don’t usually buy in bulk, this is a good time to do it. Buy stuff your family likes well enough to fix for themselves.  Make sure you have plenty of essentials like toilet paper, shampoo, and kitty litter.
  4. Take care of your computer. If it’s been freezing up on you lately, take time to figure out what the problem is and fix it NOW, before November 1. You will not have time to mess with a cranky computer.
  5. Decide what you will write about. If you only have a vague idea, fine. Don’t let that vague idea just swirl around in your head. Write it down in a sentence or two.  Then ask your self questions about your idea. Where does the story take place? Who does it happen to? Why does it happen? How does it change your VP character?  When an answer to one of these questions comes to you, write it down. Each question you answer will inspire more questions. Write them down, too, and answer each one as fully as you can.  This is FAIR.  The nano rules allow for planning during October.
Guess I better get busy!
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4 Comments

  1. Laura Johnson October 29, 2011 11:15 pm Reply

    Hello! That was nice of you to post a link to my blog….What a great way to network with fellow NaNoWriMo-ers :) Thanks for the wonderful tips–this will be my first year. Of your seven years as a participant, did you hit 50,000 words every time? Good luck!! :)

    http://specializingintheimpossible

    • Carolyn October 29, 2011 11:28 pm Reply

      Hi Laura, Yes, I wrote 50,000 words each year, but none of the novels were finished during November. Every time I spend most of the next 11 months revising. I love nano because it lets me turn off the editor side, just write, and get that first draft down.

  2. snagglewordz October 30, 2011 8:13 am Reply

    Hi Carolyn, it sounds like you are an old hand at NaNoWriMo. Thanks for the tips, especially number 5! Best of luck for this year.

    http://snagglewordz.com/

  3. Leeswammes (Judith) October 30, 2011 8:41 am Reply

    This is my first time participating. I like the idea of just writing and not worrying too much about whether it’s any good or not.

    We’ll see how it goes! Good luck to you.

    http://leeswammes.wordpress.com

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